Ross Pringle

Design Engineering Graduate Apprentice

Meet Ross Pringle. Find out what inspired him to do an engineering graduate apprenticeship and hear about the range of placements and activities he is undertaking during the programme.

16 June 2020

When did you join Leonardo?

During my Arkwright Engineering Scholarship* – which is awarded to high-calibre 16 year old students and supports them through two years of A levels, Scottish Advanced Highers or equivalent qualifications – I was lucky enough to sit in the cockpit of a Typhoon fighter jet. That really fired my enthusiasm to work with defence aircraft. Also, my family works with mountain rescue, which means I know how important Search and Rescue (SAR) helicopters are to bringing people home safely. Since Leonardo manufactures SAR helicopters such as the AW101 and the AW189, as well as many of the radars used for such missions, applying for a graduate apprenticeship here in Edinburgh was a natural choice. My graduate apprenticeship provides practical hands-on experience while studying for a degree. It’s giving me the best of both worlds and I’m really enjoying my first year.

Tell us about your typical day

As a graduate apprentice, I work in placement three days a week and study for my degree two days a week. I’m on rotational placements, meaning that I move all over the business working on various projects. For instance, one day I could be developing software that handles data produced by our surveillance radars, and on another day I could be designing and developing new test equipment to assist in the production of our advanced targeting devices for fighter jets and attack helicopters. Once a month, I attend The University of Strathclyde in Glasgow as part of my Graduate Apprenticeship, where I complete exams and assessments.

Why was an apprenticeship the right path for you?

While I appreciate that I’m still young, I’ve known for a while I wanted a career in engineering. The graduate apprenticeship mixes practical, real life experience with the theory and knowledge taught through distance learning at university. Obviously, it’s also a real bonus that the company is paying for my degree and I am being paid while learning how to do a job I love!

What do you do outside of your apprenticeship?

Within work, I’m a STEM Ambassador, supporting a range of STEM outreach projects with schools and through events. I have also contributed to Leonardo’s STEM@Home campaign, providing instructions about making your own paper boat.

Outside work, I spend some of my free time volunteering at Search & Rescue Dog Association (SARDA) Southern Scotland, acting as a ‘missing person’ to help train Search and Rescue dogs. I also enjoy running, and I have great social life with the other Leonardo apprentices, especially since moving into a flat in Edinburgh.

What are your career aspirations?

For the next few years, I’m focused on learning as much as I can from the various engineering roles across Leonardo and completing my degree. After that, I’d like to move into a permanent role to develop the skills I’ve learned, aiming to eventually run my own team and progress to a senior position within the company.

What do you enjoy most about your job?

As a Design Engineering Graduate Apprentice, the best part for me is getting to move around the business. This is great as it gives insight into how our products are developed, from conceptual designs all the way through to production. It’s awesome to be able to work on such complex pieces of engineering such as radars and advanced targeting devices.

* Leonardo is one of the supporters of the Arkwright Scholarships, providing sponsorship to 16-18 year old students through their studies.